Monthly Archives: January 2011

Update: completed work for Jan. 31

Here’s my updated brochure as of the end of Monday, January 31. I’m still debating on the background, so I’ve printed versions with and without gradients behind.

Here is a close up of the mileage chart. I spent a good amount of time redesigning this today. I think this version is much more readable than the original:


Day 2: Map design progress

We talked a lot about our projects today. I can’t wait to see everyone’s finished products! Here’s where I’ve gone with my design so far. (I’m probably going to change the background.)

 

I also emailed RRVT to see if they have any high resolution images I can use, in case I have room for photos (I was thinking of having a few shots to highlight the trails if possible). We’ll see what they have to offer.

 


Day 1: sketch of map design

After our first working class, here is my concept for my information design. I am designing a trail map of Raccoon River Valley Trail in central Iowa. The map will be a portable brochure (able to fit in a biker’s jersey or back pocket) that visitors can pick up at any of the trailhead locations.

Here is a rough sketch of the back of the map:

The opposite side will be a map, which I will re-design based on this one, provided by raccoonrivervalleytrail.org:

 


Mind mapping

On Wednesday we did a class mind mapping exercise to generate ideas for our first assignment. Here are several parts of the maps I found helpful for my design. As of now, I think I’m going to make an informational design on trails and greenways in the city.

 


Trail map example

I chose a map that highlighted ATV/Jeep trails. The main attraction to this was the bold colors and relative readability of the map. The trails are highlighted in bright colors oversetting a normal road map. The different trails are divided by color and number into areas, with an easy-to-read key to the right of the map.

My first glance at this map was very quick, but in that time I had already understood the main points of it, which I think is important to good information design. Map readers want something they can look at quickly without having to analyze it, and I think this example does a great job at giving a lot of info with a short amount of time and effort.